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Buffalo Co-Lab advances an equitable economy and democratic community, collaboratively integrating scholarly and practical understanding to strengthen civic action.

Five Lessons Learned During The High Road

Niagara Falls

By Vindhya Kathuria

 

  1. Work-life balance is important: Allow yourself the time and space to properly rest and recharge after the work day is over. This is not like Cornell where you finish classes for the day, but must now lock yourself in the library to work on your assignments & study for tests & complete your problem sets. Once you are done working for the day you are truly DONE.

 

  1. There is so much to be learned from your fellow fellows: Your fellow fellows are so incredibly cool and diverse in their interests, hobbies, experiences, backgrounds, etc. Ask them about their hometowns, passions, favorite foods, what they are involved in at and outside Cornell, what they like to do for fun, etc. You will be amazed and inspired and you will learn so much!

 

  1. Grocery shopping is an art: This was my first time having to grocery shop for myself and boy did my parents make it look easy! Figuring out what to buy and how much to buy and meal planning and prepping in your head and learning how long things last in the fridge is an art in itself. But it is an art you will soon master. 

 

  1. Don't be afraid to ask for opportunities at work: Be honest and open with your supervisor about your strengths and your areas for growth that you would perhaps like to improve. Don’t be afraid to ask your supervisor if you can help with something that you feel could enhance your skills and would be a great learning opportunity, or is perhaps something you feel the organization really needs and could greatly benefit from. 

 

  1. Your ideas are valued: At the beginning of the fellowship you may be afraid to put your ideas on the table whether that is during discussion on Fridays or during work with your supervisors. I know that I often second guessed myself or doubted my ideas and would find myself saying “maybe we could do this …” instead of  “I think we should do this” in conversation with my supervisors. Your ideas are valued and needed and your input is much appreciated!