Cornell University

Institute for Compensation Studies™

273 Ives Faculty Building, 607-255-4424

Optimizing Performance Pay and Managing Compensation Change ICS403

$1950.00

  • June 10, 2015 - June 11, 2015 - New York, NY
    9:00am - 5:00pm
    New York City ILR Conference Center, 16 East 34th Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY
    Faculty:
    Linda Barrington
    Linda Barrington, is Executive Director, Institute for Compensation Studies at Cornell University-ILR School. Her research appears in peer-reviewed journals and business publications and covers wide-ranging topics including new workforce entrants, business leaders' perceptions of their top challenges, compensation trends, the working poor, economic history and gender economics. Linda's book, Employment and Work (2012), was published in the Sage Reference Series on Disability. She is a frequent contributor to the media. Linda began her professional career on the economics faculty at Barnard College of Columbia University. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois.

    Stephanie R. Thomas
    Stephanie R. Thomas, is a Research Associate of the Institute for Compensation Studies in the ILR School and a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Cornell University. Stephanie has completed research and published on a variety of labor economics topics including wage determination, pay gaps and inequality, and the quantitative analysis of employment discrimination. She is the author of Compensating Your Employees Fairly: A Guide to Internal Pay Equity. During her 15-year consulting career, she specialized in the analysis of equal employment issues and provided consulting services to Fortune 500 companies, privately held businesses, major law firms and government agencies. Stephanie has also served on the faculty of New York University, where she was awarded the Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Stephanie holds a Ph.D. in Economics from The New School for Social Research.

** Nonprofit and public sector employees are eligible for a 15% discount on tuition for this course.
** If you need an alternative to registering online or are a member of the ILR Alumni Association,
please click here for information on registration procedures.

A compensation philosophy centered on performance-based pay sends a message of accountability and establishes expectations of employees. But, the less prepared an organization is to manage this approach, the more difficult execution will be. Managing employee expectations plays a critical role. Employees need to clearly understand what is expected of them, and how meeting those expectations will be rewarded. In this process, it is essential to recognize the divergent values that different groups of employees place on compensation and how to best engage them in strengthening the pay and performance link.

This two-day course will outline how to build the appropriate contextual framework for optimizing the change process of aligning the organization's peformance goals with employee behaviors and preferences. Strategies for communicating compensation change associated with performance-based pay systems will be discussed. Real-world scenarios illustrate how to achieve business objectives and strategic ambitions. Emphasis is placed on considering customized action plans, rather than “one size fits all” solutions.

Who Should Attend?

This course is designed for compensation practitioners, analysts, managers and experienced HR professionals and business partners who want to improve their capabilities and insight across a broad spectrum of pay-for-performance considerations.

What is the Course Curriculum?

Designed in collaboration with senior faculty at Cornell University’s ILR School, this course offers the perfect blend of academic study and practical application. The course content includes case studies to illustrate key concepts, and is underpinned by an evidence-based, social science approach.  

Topics addressed in this course include:

  • Aligning pay mix, organizational goals and divergent employee values and preferences
  • Effectively communicating with employees and managing their expectations
  • Examining common challenges associated with implementing or strengthening a performance-based compensation system
  • Considerations in successfully bringing change to the pay system

How will my organization and I benefit?

Participants will leave the course with an improved capacity to analyze and evaluate the efficacy of performance-based pay systems. Organizations can benefit through improved allocation of financial and human capital resources and a richer understanding of the effects of pay for performance on the success of their operations.

Faculty


Linda Barrington, is Executive Director, Institute for Compensation Studies at Cornell University-ILR School. Her research appears in peer-reviewed journals and business publications and covers wide-ranging topics including new workforce entrants, business leaders' perceptions of their top challenges, compensation trends, the working poor, economic history and gender economics. Linda's book, Employment and Work (2012), was published in the Sage Reference Series on Disability. She is a frequent contributor to the media. Linda began her professional career on the economics faculty at Barnard College of Columbia University. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois.

Stephanie R. Thomas, is a Research Associate of the Institute for Compensation Studies in the ILR School and a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Cornell University. Stephanie has completed research and published on a variety of labor economics topics including wage determination, pay gaps and inequality, and the quantitative analysis of employment discrimination. She is the author of Compensating Your Employees Fairly: A Guide to Internal Pay Equity. During her 15-year consulting career, she specialized in the analysis of equal employment issues and provided consulting services to Fortune 500 companies, privately held businesses, major law firms and government agencies. Stephanie has also served on the faculty of New York University, where she was awarded the Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Stephanie holds a Ph.D. in Economics from The New School for Social Research.