New York City Event: Seeking Justice for War Crimes in El Salvador

A five-city tour featuring Tutela Legal’s Attorney Alejandro Diaz and SHARE El Salvador’s Executive Director Jose Artiga
Tutela Legal’s Attorney Alejandro Diaz and SHARE El Salvador’s Executive Director Jose Artiga
Monday, October 12, 2015

During the 12-year civil war in El Salvador in the 1980s, the labor movement was crucial member of the international solidarity community advocating for an end to the war and for the protection of civilians.

Join us to learn more about the current struggle by the people of El Salvador to seek justice for human right violations and to investigate war crimes that occurred during the war.

Date: Monday November 9
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 PM
Location: ILR Conference Center
16 E 34th St., 6th Floor, New York City (between 5th Ave & Madison Av)

Coffee & snacks will be served. Admission is free but space is limited. To RSVP e-mail sjr29@cornell.edu or call 212-340-2809.

OPENING REMARKS

Patricia Campos-Medina, The Worker Institute at Cornell
Patricia is Co-director of the NYS AFL-CIO/Cornell Union Leadership Initiative (ULI), and also serves as an advisor for SHARE El Salvador’s Women Empowerment and Leadership Development Programs. 

SPEAKERS

Alejandro Diaz
, Attorney, Tutela Legal
Tutela Legal advocates for the release of the files of victims who suffered human rights violations and for reparations for the relatives of those massacred in El Mozote, Rio Sumpul, La Quezera, El Carrizal, and others during the 12 year war in El Salvador. They also advocate for justice for the murder of San Romero of the Americas (Monseignor Romero).

Jose Artiga, Executive Director, SHARE El Salvador
SHARE works in solidarity with and among the Salvadoran people in five key areas; leadership development, women empowerment, citizen participation and environmental sustainability. SHARE also supports organizing efforts among Salvadoran workers in the free-export zones in El Salvador and supports the struggles of public sector workers against privatization in key sectors of the Salvadoran economy.