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Worker Protections at Risk: The Supreme Court Abandons Chevron Deference

The Supreme Court just decided on two blockbuster cases that challenged the regulatory authority of federal government agencies. The court broke from previous jurisprudence set 40 years ago, called the Chevron deference, by the federal courts to agency expertise. This decision will have ripple effects across all aspects of federal law enforcement, including those that protect workers. We will explore possible impacts on labor and employment law at both the federal and state levels. Please join us as we explore the potential impact on worker rights.

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Overview

In 1984, the Supreme Court ruled in Chevron v. Natural Resource Defence Council, stating that courts should defer to an agency's reasonable interpretation when there is a dispute about an ambiguous statute. This ruling has stood for almost 40 years of legislation, rulemaking, and regulation until today. The Supreme Court ruled in two cases, Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo and Relentless, Inc. v. Department of Commerce that the administrative state and federal agencies' regulatory authority should be limited. The court overruled this precedent known as the Chevron deference doctrine. This decision will have ripple effects across all aspects of federal regulations. Here, we explore possible impacts on labor and employment law enforcement and what New York State can do to protect workers and enforce NYS law powers amidst such a sweeping change. 

Please join us as we explore the potential impacts on state and federal worker regulation.

Speakers

  • Director, Labor and Employment Law Programs, ILR School

  • Solicitor, National Labor Relations Board

  • Senior Counsel, American Federation of Labor & Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO)

  • Executive Director, New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH)
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