Remembering the Triangle Factory Fire, 100 years later

PHOTOS & ILLUSTRATIONS

Commemoration

  • In the Workman's Circle burial society of the Mount Zion cemetery, surrounding 14 graves with Triangle fire victims' names inscribed on individual pillars, a fence carries the message “In Memory of the young men and women who perished in the fire at the Triangle Waist Company’s shop, Asch building, N.Y. March 25th 1911. Erected November 1911 by their sisters and brothers, members of the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union Local Number 25.”
  • The Triangle Fire Memorial to the Unknowns in the Evergreens Cemetery, Brooklyn, was created in 1912 by Evelyn Beatrice Longman. Below a carving of a woman mourning, the inscription reads, “In sympathy and sorrow citizens of New York raise this monument over the graves of unidentified women and children who with one hundred and thirty nine others perished by fire in the Triangle Shirtwaist factory Washington Place March 25 1911.”
  • Fannia Cohn stands next to a wreath placed at the Longman commemorative monument for the seven unidentified Triangle fire victims in Brooklyn’s Evergreens Cemetery.
  • A wreath laid at the Longman monument for the seven unidentified victims of the Triangle fire in Brooklyn’s Evergreens Cemetery. Ribbons say “To the Martyrs of Greed, the Triangle Fire Victims. From the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.
  • Burial marker for Triangle fire victim Rosie Mehl, aged 15 years.
  • Burial marker for Triangle fire victim Sarah Cooper, aged 16 years.
  • Burial marker for Triangle fire victim Isi Rosen, aged 17 years.
  • Burial marker for Triangle fire victim Daisy Lopez Fitzi [Fitze], January 11, 1887- March 27, 1911. The inscription reads “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.
  • A reunion for the 50th Anniversary of the shirtwaist strike held at Cooper Union includes Fannia Cohen (in coat and hat at the end of the left set of exhibit cases).
  • Jane Hoffman, Tobey Weinburg, Ruth Goodman and Amelia Romano perform a radio play based on the Triangle fire.
  • Leon Stein, author of The Triangle Fire, looks out an NYU classroom window in the Brown Building (formerly called the Asch Building) which housed the Triangle Waist Company.
  • Esther Peterson, Assistant Secretary of Labor and Director of the Women’s Bureau under President Kennedy, speaks at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle fire.
  • Fire Commissioner Edward F. Cavanagh, Jr., Jacob Potofsky, President of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America; David Dubinsky, President of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union; and Leon Stein, author of The Triangle Fire; at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle fire.
  • Frances Perkins, Secretary of Labor under Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt talk together during the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle fire.
  • Fire Commissioner Edward F. Cavanagh, Jr. speaks at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire.
  • During the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire, representatives of the New York Fire Department pay their respects to victims of the blaze.
  • An unidentified speaker, possibly NYU Professor Robert Holzman, at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire.
  • An unidentified speaker at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire.
  • Speakers, Triangle fire survivors, firefighters and the public gather in front of NYU’s Brown Building, formerly known as the Asch Building, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Triangle factory fire.
  • A crowd gathers in front of the former Asch Building for the 50th anniversary commemoration of the blaze. Ranks of uniformed fire fighters, speakers and special guests on the stage stand at attention.
  • The crowd and fire trucks at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire.
  • A steam fire engine and modern fire truck parked next to attendees at the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire.
  • Former Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins, Triangle fire survivor Rose Schneiderman, and International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union President David Dubinsky, join fire fighters next to the newly-unveiled commemorative plaque and wreath during the 50th anniversary of the Triangle factory fire. The plaque reads “On this site, 146 workers lost their lives in the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire on March 25, 1911. Out of their martyrdom came new concepts of social responsibility and labor legislation that have helped make American working conditions the finest in the world. International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, March 25, 1961.”
  • International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union President David Dubinsky, fire fighters, and others stand around the Longman memorial in the Brooklyn’s Evergreens Cemetery to commemorate the unidentified victims of the Triangle fire.
  • During the 50th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire, International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union President David Dubinsky speaks to those gathered around the Longman memorial monument to the unidentified victims of the tragedy.
  • People gather at the Longman monument to the unidentified victims of the Triangle fire during the 50th anniversary commemoration of the tragedy.
  • During the 60th anniversary commemoration of the Triangle factory fire, Josephine Nicolosi, retired member of Italian Dressmakers Local 89 and a survivor of the Triangle fire, stands in front of a plaque marking the tragedy with an honor guard including New York Fire Department Battalion Chief James McQuade.
  • Marking the 63rd anniversary of the Triangle factory fire, Pauline Newman, an International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union organizer and employee of the Triangle Waist Company, stands with representatives of the union including Murray Gross, Israel Breslow, Shelley Appleton, and Manny Gonzalez, and with Walter LaStrange, James Thomson and Leonard Eberlein of the New York Fire Department.
  • Triangle fire survivor Pauline Newman and New York Fire Commissioner Charles Hines join a small group gathered in front of the commemorative plaque and memorial wreath during the 70th anniversary of the Triangle factory fire.
  • International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Executive Vice President Wilbur Daniels, Rabbi Emily Korzenik, International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Local 23-25 Manager Jay Mazur, and others gather around the Longman memorial to the unidentified victims of the Triangle factory fire at Evergreens Cemetery. The inscription reads “In sympathy and sorrow citizens of New York raise this monument over the graves of the unidentified women and children who with one hundred and thirty nine others perished by fire in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Washington Place March 25 1911.”
  • Fred Siems, Shelly Appleton and a representative of New York fire fighters place a memorial wreath in front of the commemorative plaque during the 83rd anniversary of the Triangle factory fire.
  • During the 79th anniversary of the Triangle factory fire, members of Ladder Company 20 raise their ladder to the sixth floor of the building which housed the Triangle Waist Company. This was the highest floor that could be reached by ladder during the blaze.
  • Each year the members of Ladder Company 20 participate in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union commemoration of the 1911 Triangle Waist Company fire in which 146 garment workers perished. On August 23, 1990, ILGWU President Jay Mazur presented New York Fire Commissioner Carlos Rivera and Ladder Company 20 with a plaque and framed photo showing the Ladder Company fighting the fire.
  • During a Triangle factory fire commemoration, members of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, Western States Region, observe a moment of silence. Their placards read “We will not forget the Triangle fire victims” and “Remember the Victims of the Triangle Fire.”
  • At a rally by the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union at the site of Triangle fire, placards in English and Spanish naming Domsey Fiber include “We shall not forget” and “Trabajadores uniodos hamas seran vencidos” pointing to the continuing struggles of immigrant workers.
  • During the 80th anniversary of the Triangle factory fire, International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union President Jay Mazur, Firefighter Cecilia Cox, and Mayor David Dinkins observe a moment of silence while the bell tolls for the 146 shirtwaist makers who died in the blaze.
  • Triangle fire survivor, 101 year old Pauline Pepe, is visited by Michael Grimaldi, manager of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Nassau-Suffolk District, a week after the March 25 Triangle fire anniversary.
  • International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union members at the Triangle fire commemoration carry placards demanding reform of OSHA laws and “Safe Jobs Now.”
  • At the 1992 anniversary of the Triangle factory fire, a banner proclaims, “NYU Workers Demand a Healthy and Safe Workplace!” and placards call for “Safe Jobs Now.”
  • Ladder Company 20, which responded to the 1911 Triangle fire, symbolically raises a ladder to the sixth floor, the highest level that could reached at the time of the fire.
  • During the 83rd anniversary of the Triangle factory fire, members of PS 41’s fifth grade class hold signs saying “Safe jobs NOW” and “No More!” in several languages.
  • During a commemoration of the Triangle factory fire, a memorial wreath is placed in front of the historical plaque.
Sweatshop conditions in the early 1900's

PHOTOS BY CATEGORY