Cornell University

International Programs

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Faculty Profile

Rebecca Givan, Assistant Professor, Collective Bargaining

Rebecca GivanIt has been over a year since Professor Rebecca Givan joined the ILR School’s Faculty as Assistant Professor in the Collective Bargaining Department. Prior to Cornell, Rebecca Givan was in Britain conducting research and wrapping up her dissertation on the Employment and National Health Service Reform of Britain.  She spent her three and a half years in Britain at the London School of Economics and then Cardiff University. She was a Research Officer at the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE and a lecturer at Cardiff. She furthered her research interests on public sector employment in the United Kingdom, healthcare workers, and welfare state reform particularly relating to Britain’s National Health Service and continues to do so today. Publications such as the future of unions in modern Britain summarize some of her research on privatization ofBritain’s National Health Service . Rebecca Givan spends a majority of her time exploring the labor implications that result. She also collaborates with scholars such as a recent ILR Visiting Fellow, Stephen Bach, on the topic. At LSE, she worked on The Future of Unions in Modern Britain program funded by The Leverhulme Trust, producing publications jointly with Stephen Bach (Kings College, London). Since joining ILR, Rebecca has continued her research on the UK, and continues to conduct most of her fieldwork in British workplaces. 

Rebecca Givan is no stranger to Britain as she spent the majority of her childhood and adolescence there. Her interest in the United Kingdom, healthcare workers, and welfare state reform is clear in her research and publications. At Cornell, she teaches courses in collective bargaining, perspectives on welfare and the political economy of the UK. Future field work in the UK is certainly a possibility, especially as the changes in labor relations and employment that stem from the partial privatization of the health care system in Britain continue. A range of factors including health migration, professional standards, visa status, unionization and more all come into play when studying this issue.

- Dina Gabriel

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