Cornell University

Scheinman Institute on Conflict Resolution

456 ILR Research Building, 607-255-9298

Designing Effective Dispute Resolution Systems for the Workplace DR140

Not currently offered

This program currently has no scheduled dates.

The objective of this program is to develop the capability required for a participant to design and implement a workplace dispute resolution system. This program is designed for the Human Resource Executive, ADR Consultant, Employment Attorney, or Union Leader participating in the design of a workplace dispute system. We invite entire "in-house design teams" to attend the program.

This program is highly participative, with an emphasis on class discussion and an exploration of contracting and delivery techniques. Two case studies will be used as a learning vehicle, one from the private sector and one from the public sector.

Agenda for Day One:

  • Contracting with the organization for the intervention
  • Assessing readiness and commitment
  • Establishing the design team
  • Diagnosing current states of conflict
  • Assessing current procedures for effectiveness
  • Considering a Design Consultant
  • Understanding the range of system options
  • Defining the metrics of success
  • Designing the optimal model through stakeholder workshops
  • Gaining final approval from senior leadership
  • The value-added benefits of Union/Employee participation

Agenda for Day Two:

  • Implementing the initiative
  • Supervisory training
  • Employee communications
  • Overcoming resistance
  • Measuring effectiveness
  • Developing your own prototype system
  • Barriers to Effectiveness
  • The Due-Process Protocol: Ensuring fairness and integrity
  • The Future of Workplace Dispute Systems

Each participant will receive a copy of the seminal text "Emerging Systems for Managing Workplace Conflict, Lessons from American Corporations for Managers and Dispute Resolution Professionals" 2003, by Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Labor Union leaders are encouraged to attend this seminar. Research by the instructors has demonstrated that labor unions have increasingly accepted workplace systems as a potentially viable vehicle to resolve quality of work life disputes with their members. The workplace systems do not involve grievable issues, but rather those interpersonal issues that require much time of the Union leader.