Cornell University

Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies

193 Ives Faculty Building, 607-255-9358

2008 White Papers Collection



Building a Sustainable HR Model for China (January 2008) 

The papers that follow discuss the challenges facing the HR function in China from external sourcing and internal development perspectives, as well as the impact of changing government regulations. Much of the associated research was obtained through interviews with individuals currently working in HR roles in China. These individuals represent eight CAHRS partner companies, five of which compete in the manufacturing industry, two in the pharmaceutical industry and one in the technology industry. Seven of the eight companies are headquartered in the United States and rank in the Fortune 500; four of the seven firms specifically rank in the Fortune 50. The remaining company ranks in the Fortune 100. Additional information was obtained via interviews with three Chinese-national graduate students studying HR at Cornell University:

Growth in the Middle East and HR Capabilities (Spring 2008)

The following white papers discuss research and writings of interest to companies either currently operating in the Middle East or considering an entrance to the region. These topics include localization / nationalization, free trade zones, culture, the role of women in the region and managing compensation. This collection also includes three papers that were originally written for the 2006 sponsor meeting, The Talent Management Challenge. These papers have been updated to include “Focus on the Middle East” sections that specifically address the region’s utilization of and challenges regarding talent management topics such as employment branding, high potential identification, succession planning and leadership development. Each paper includes an annotated bibliography, which lists descriptions of additional resources regarding that paper’s topic. Much of the research for these papers was obtained through interviews with individuals currently working in HR roles in the Middle East. These individuals represent both CAHRS partner companies and non-CAHRS partner companies. Many of these companies are locally based in the Middle East, while others are based in either the United States or Europe but have active operations in the region. These companies represent a broad range of industries, including manufacturing, aerospace, travel and tourism, food and beverage, energy, real estate development, government, education, financial services and technology:

Telework in Today's Marketplace (Fall 2008)


Summary: Telework has now become an accepted practice and an expected part of organizational life. Despite the history and prevalence of telework, these programs still present unique challenges for today’s companies and Human Resource professionals. Which roles are appropriate telework candidates? How should employees be selected to participate in telework programs? Does the corporate culture support the idea of remote workers? What kind of impact will telework have on managers and in-office employees? Will telework improve customer satisfaction?

This research report, prepared by the graduate research assistants of the Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies (CAHRS) at Cornell University, is an attempt to provide a window into current remote work practices, highlight the benefits and pitfalls of telework arrangements, and report the findings of primary research interviews conducted with business leaders.

The report also examines the impact of telework programs on corporate security and the human resource function itself. In a time of economic upheaval and recession, this report will be a valuable tool for professionals to evaluate current telework practices and their potential to both reduce operational costs and attract and retain a more flexible, resilient workforce.

Preparing for the Employee Free Choice Act (Fall 2008)


Summary: The 2008 political cycle in the United States drew the attention of the world. Record amounts of money were raised in preparation for tight political races and debates in local, state and federal elections. The race for the U.S. presidency following the Democratic and Republican Primaries resulted in a spirited campaign between Senator Barack Obama and Senator John McCain. With a backdrop of ongoing U.S. military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq and a turbulent economy at home, the campaign resulted in massive voter interest and turnout throughout the United States. Senator Obama’s decisive victory will result in numerous legislative and philosophical changes as the new leader of the United States.

For human resource professionals, the changes in leadership at the Presidential level require an assessment of the most influential pieces of labor legislation pending in the congress and an evaluation of how legislative changes will impact businesses and workforces. The most dramatic legislation pending in Congress is known as the Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA). The EFCA would be the most significant labor relations law change since the 1940’s.

This research report, prepared by the graduate research assistants of the Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies (CAHRS) at Cornell University, is an attempt to demystify the Employee Free Choice Act, provide some historical context for the legislation and report the findings of primary research interviews conducted with business, labor and policy leaders. The report will also provide analysis of the potential short and long term impact of the legislation.

In a time of tremendous political change this report will be a valuable tool for professionals seeking data and information on one of the hottest topics in industrial and labor relations.