Cornell University

Undergraduate Admissions

Advancing the world of work

Undergraduate Research

One major, endless research opportunities

Sam Bacharach talking with a studentILR provides unique opportunities for undergraduate students to collaborate with professors within their research areas or to pursue independent research. The School enhances students' participation in research with faculty mentoring and fellowships to financially support projects. Students involved in research develop close relationships with faculty, become authors or coauthors of published articles, and present at conferences and meetings.

Recent research projects include:

  • Entrepreneurship in the Nonprofit Sector
  • Crime, Welfare, and Employment: How do economic conditions affect rates of criminal activity?
  • A Legislative and Judicial History of Equality in the Workplace
  • MBA Students' Perceptions of Labor Unions
  • Sources of Consolidation in the 21st Century Veterinary Hospital

Senior Honors Thesis

Outstanding ILR seniors who want to conduct an independent research project can receive course credit for a two-semester honors thesis research project. Students are supervised by an ILR faculty member, will write a thesis that will be examined and defended before the faculty supervisor, and may receive funding to defray the costs of research.

Rawlings Scholars Program

The Rawlings Scholars program supports up to 200 undergraduates each year from across academic disciplines and colleges to work with faculty mentors to design, plan, and carry out individualized research projects. Students who are selected as scholars receive a research support account ($8,000 for students admitted as freshmen; $5,000 for those admitted as juniors), along with an annual need-based loan replacement of up to $4,000.

Teresa Danso-Danquah, ILR '15 and a Hunter R. Rawlings III Cornell Presidential Research Scholar, is currently collaborating with the Employment and Disability Institute on a New York State needs assessment of siblings of people with disabilities. She enjoys engaging in research because it allows her to be part of an inquisitive process, but also because it can be seen as a means to an end. "The best part of doing research," Danso-Danquah says, "is that you get to explore areas you're passionate about while learning how to make effective changes."

The Rawlings Presidential Research Scholars program is part of The Cornell Commitment, which also includes the Meinig Family Cornell National Scholars program and The Cornell Tradition.

For more information on ILR student research, visit the ILR Student Services website. Also, please see the website for The Research Paper, a magazine written and published by undergraduates that features research stories from across the Cornell campus.