Cornell University

Institute for Compensation Studies™

273 Ives Faculty Building, 607-255-4424

Shifting Landscapes and Equitable Compensation ICS500

$1150.00

  • Oct 30, 2014 - New York, NY
    9:00am - 5:00pm
    New York City ILR Conference Center, 16 East 34th Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY
    Faculty:
    Linda Barrington
    Linda Barrington, Executive Director, Institute for Compensation Studies, ILR School at Cornell University. Linda Barrington has completed research on new workforce entrants, business leaders' perceptions of their top challenges, compensation trends, the working poor, economic history and gender economics. Her work appears in the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of Economic History, the Historical Statistics of the U.S., the WorldatWork Journal, and numerous reports published by The Conference Board. Her recent book, Employment and Work: Key Issues and Future Directions, is published in the SAGE Reference Series on Disability. She has received underwriting for her research from the Atlantic Philanthropies, Rockefeller Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation, Gates Foundation, and most recently the U.S. Department of Education. Linda comes to the Institute for Compensation Studies from The Conference Board, a global business membership and research organization. There, she held several positions, most recently Managing Director of Human Capital. She began her professional career on the economics faculty at Barnard College of Columbia University. She has also taught economics at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), the University of Michigan, and the University of Illinois. She earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois, and a B.S. in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

    Kevin F. Hallock
    Kevin F. Hallock, Donald C. Opatrny '74 Chair, Department of Economics, Joseph R. Rich '80 Professor, Economics and Human Resource Studies, and Director, Institute for Compensation Studies, ILR School at Cornell University. Kevin Hallock's current research is focused on the intersection of compensation design and labor markets, executive compensation, the valuation of stock options, and the plan design and mix of employee compensation. He has written extensively on executive compensation in the for-profit and nonprofit worlds. His most recent book is Pay: Why People Earn What They Earn and What You Can Do Now to Make More, Cambridge University Press. Kevin Hallock has been published in a variety of outlets including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Corporate Finance, the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, The Journal of Public Economics, the Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Industrial Relations, the Journal of Economic Perspectives, and Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management. He has co-edited four volumes on Labor Economics and two volumes on Executive Compensation. Funding for his research has come from various sources, including the American Compensation Association, the Intel Corporation, the National Bureau of Economic Research, the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Department of Education and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He serves on the Board of the Society of Certified Professionals at WorldatWork and on the Compensation Committee of Guthrie Health. He earned a B.A. in Economics, Summa Cum Laude, from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.

    Stephanie R. Thomas
    Stephanie R. Thomas, Research Associate, Institute for Compensation Studies, ILR School at Cornell University. Stephanie Thomas is the author of Compensating Your Employees Fairly: A Guide to Internal Pay Equity, Apress/Springer Science & Business. She has been published in various outlets including the Journal of Compensation and Benefits, Best Practices in Compensation and Benefits, Mealey's Litigation Report: Employment Law, Corporate Counselor, and Bloomberg Law Report. She frequently speaks to professional organizations such as SHRM on the quantitative analysis of compensation and selection decisions. Ms. Thomas comes to the Institute for Compensation Studies from a 15 year career as an economic and statistical consultant, working with Fortune 500 companies, privately held businesses, major law firms, and federal and state government agencies such as the Department of Justice and the FBI. She has testified as an expert witness in federal and state courts throughout the United States. Prior to her consulting career, she served on the Faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences at New York University, receiving two teaching awards. Stephanie Thomas earned a B.A. in Economics, Summa Cum Laude, from Elmira College and a Ph.D. in economics from The New School for Social Research.

** Nonprofit and public sector employees are eligible for a 15% discount on tuition for this seminar. 
** If you need an alternative to registering online, please click here for information on registration procedures.

As an HR and compensation leader, it falls to you to drive the realities and influence the perceptions of equitable and effective pay practice and strategy.

Compensating employees equitably has been linked to gains in organizational efficiency, reduced costs, and increased competitive advantage in the talent and customer marketplaces. Inequities in compensation, on the other hand, bring a variety of internal and external risks. But who decides what is "equitable?" From shareholder activists to frontline employees, optics matter. The characteristics of the organization, the workforce and the competitive landscape all play a major role in creating – and evaluating – perceptions of pay equity.

This one day seminar will address a broad range of strategic issues related to equitable compensation, not just with respect to specific protected groups. The seminar will present a variety of quantitative and non-quantitative tools to assess your compensation policies and practices. Multiple, real-world scenarios illustrate how to achieve business objectives and strategic ambitions. Emphasis is placed on insightful conversaiton, rather than “one size fits all” tactics.

Who Should Attend?

This seminar is designed for experienced compensation practitioners, managers, HR professionals and their business partners who want to reframe their thinking on compensation, adopting a more strategic and metrics-based approach.

Class size is limited to facilitate interaction with faculty, stimulate peer-professional exchange, and create a participatory learning experience.

What is the Seminar Curriculum?

Developed in collaboration with senior faculty from the Cornell ILR School, this seminar offers the perfect blend of academic study and organizational application. The seminar content includes cutting-edge research, underpinned by an evidence-based, social science approach. Active discussion with peer-professionals contributes significantly to the seminar experience.

Topics addressed in this seminar include:

  • Navigating changing regulatory focus on pay gaps while considering equity across all employees
  • Adapting to the new CEO-to-Worker Pay Ratio reporting requirement
  • Understanding and balancing employee preferences and performance pay effectiveness
  • Managing the compensation-related conversations your employees are having with one another, often on social media

This program has been submitted to the HR Certification Institute for review.

Note: The information presented in this seminar is for educational purposes and should not be interpreted as legal advice.

How will my organization and I benefit?

Participants will leave the seminar with improved capability to assess, shape and drive strategic compensation practice and policy. Organizations can consider their compensation equity, not just with respect to specific protected groups, but in a broader systems and strategic framework. This in turn can lead to efficiency gains, reduced costs, and increased competitive advantage in the marketplace for talent and customers.

Faculty


Linda Barrington, Executive Director, Institute for Compensation Studies, ILR School at Cornell University. Linda Barrington has completed research on new workforce entrants, business leaders' perceptions of their top challenges, compensation trends, the working poor, economic history and gender economics. Her work appears in the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of Economic History, the Historical Statistics of the U.S., the WorldatWork Journal, and numerous reports published by The Conference Board. Her recent book, Employment and Work: Key Issues and Future Directions, is published in the SAGE Reference Series on Disability. She has received underwriting for her research from the Atlantic Philanthropies, Rockefeller Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation, Gates Foundation, and most recently the U.S. Department of Education. Linda comes to the Institute for Compensation Studies from The Conference Board, a global business membership and research organization. There, she held several positions, most recently Managing Director of Human Capital. She began her professional career on the economics faculty at Barnard College of Columbia University. She has also taught economics at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), the University of Michigan, and the University of Illinois. She earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois, and a B.S. in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

Kevin F. Hallock, Donald C. Opatrny '74 Chair, Department of Economics, Joseph R. Rich '80 Professor, Economics and Human Resource Studies, and Director, Institute for Compensation Studies, ILR School at Cornell University. Kevin Hallock's current research is focused on the intersection of compensation design and labor markets, executive compensation, the valuation of stock options, and the plan design and mix of employee compensation. He has written extensively on executive compensation in the for-profit and nonprofit worlds. His most recent book is Pay: Why People Earn What They Earn and What You Can Do Now to Make More, Cambridge University Press. Kevin Hallock has been published in a variety of outlets including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Corporate Finance, the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, The Journal of Public Economics, the Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Industrial Relations, the Journal of Economic Perspectives, and Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management. He has co-edited four volumes on Labor Economics and two volumes on Executive Compensation. Funding for his research has come from various sources, including the American Compensation Association, the Intel Corporation, the National Bureau of Economic Research, the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Department of Education and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He serves on the Board of the Society of Certified Professionals at WorldatWork and on the Compensation Committee of Guthrie Health. He earned a B.A. in Economics, Summa Cum Laude, from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.

Stephanie R. Thomas, Research Associate, Institute for Compensation Studies, ILR School at Cornell University. Stephanie Thomas is the author of Compensating Your Employees Fairly: A Guide to Internal Pay Equity, Apress/Springer Science & Business. She has been published in various outlets including the Journal of Compensation and Benefits, Best Practices in Compensation and Benefits, Mealey's Litigation Report: Employment Law, Corporate Counselor, and Bloomberg Law Report. She frequently speaks to professional organizations such as SHRM on the quantitative analysis of compensation and selection decisions. Ms. Thomas comes to the Institute for Compensation Studies from a 15 year career as an economic and statistical consultant, working with Fortune 500 companies, privately held businesses, major law firms, and federal and state government agencies such as the Department of Justice and the FBI. She has testified as an expert witness in federal and state courts throughout the United States. Prior to her consulting career, she served on the Faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences at New York University, receiving two teaching awards. Stephanie Thomas earned a B.A. in Economics, Summa Cum Laude, from Elmira College and a Ph.D. in economics from The New School for Social Research.