Cornell University

Institute for Compensation Studies™

273 Ives Faculty Building, 607-255-4424

Executive, Key Talent and Superstar Pay for Performance ICS401

$1950.00

  • May 7, 2015 - May 8, 2015 - New York, NY
    9:00am - 5:00pm
    New York City ILR Conference Center, 16 East 34th Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY
    Faculty:
    Linda Barrington
    Linda Barrington, is Executive Director, Institute for Compensation Studies at Cornell University-ILR School. Her research appears in peer-reviewed journals and business publications and covers wide-ranging topics including new workforce entrants, business leaders' perceptions of their top challenges, compensation trends, the working poor, economic history and gender economics. Linda's book, Employment and Work (2012), was published in the Sage Reference Series on Disability. She is a frequent contributor to the media. Linda began her professional career on the economics faculty at Barnard College of Columbia University. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois.

    Kevin F. Hallock
    Kevin F. Hallock, is the Donald C. Opatrny '74 Chair of the Department of Economics, Joseph R. Rich '80 Professor, Professor of Economics and HR Studies, and the Director of the Institute for Compensation Studies. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA, on the Board of Directors of WorldatWork, Distinguished Principal Research Fellow at the Conference Board, and a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources. His recent book, Pay: Why People Earn What They Earn and What You Can Do Now to Make More, was awarded the Richard A. Lester Award for the Outstanding Book in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University in 1995.

    Stephanie R. Thomas
    Stephanie R. Thomas, is a Research Associate of the Institute for Compensation Studies in the ILR School and a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Cornell University. Stephanie has completed research and published on a variety of labor economics topics including wage determination, pay gaps and inequality, and the quantitative analysis of employment discrimination. She is the author of Compensating Your Employees Fairly: A Guide to Internal Pay Equity. During her 15-year consulting career, she specialized in the analysis of equal employment issues and provided consulting services to Fortune 500 companies, privately held businesses, major law firms and government agencies. Stephanie has also served on the faculty of New York University, where she was awarded the Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Stephanie holds a Ph.D. in Economics from The New School for Social Research.

    Melanie Tu
    Melanie Tu, is the Head of Compensation at Graham Holdings Company (formerly The Washington Post Company). She brings a wealth of practitioner experience in the area of compensation. In her current role, Melanie has responsibility for executive, equity, and corporate broad-based compensation and executive benefits, as well as oversight of subsidiary companies' broad-based compensation. Her work experience includes international and sales compensation roles with Marriott International and Texas Instruments. Melanie is a graduate of Cornell University's School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

** Nonprofit and public sector employees are eligible for a 15% discount on tuition for this course.
** If you need an alternative to registering online,
please click here for information on registration procedures.

Executive compensation and superstar pay have become increasing controversial in recent years. Truly understanding the basics of compensating executives, key talent and superstars is key to thinking and re-thinking how to align performance, strategy and pay for “must-retain” employees and organizational leaders.

This two-day course will outline the contextual framework for evaluating performance-based compensation of executives, key talent and superstars. The course will present quantitative and non-quantitative tools and techniques for assessing performance pay through a variety of lenses. Multiple, real-world scenarios illustrate how to achieve business objectives and strategic ambitions. Emphasis is placed on thoroughly-considered action plans, rather than “one size fits all” solutions.

While this course can be taken on a stand-alone basis, the Institute for Compensation Studies (ICS) Advanced Certificate in Performance Pay, Metrics and Practice Alignment is given to recognize completion of the four courses in the certificate curriculum.

Who Should Attend?

This course is designed for compensation practitioners, analysts, managers and experienced HR professionals and business partners who want to improve their capabilities and insight across a broad spectrum of pay-for-performance considerations.

Class size is limited to facilitate interaction with faculty, stimulate peer-professional exchange, and create a participatory learning experience.

What is the Course Curriculum?

Designed in collaboration with senior faculty at Cornell University’s ILR School, this course offers the perfect blend of academic study and practical application. The course content includes case studies to illustrate key concepts, and is underpinned by an evidence-based, social science approach.

Topics addressed in this course include:

  • Effectively aligning organizational ownership and managerial control through performance-based pay
  • Examining the relationship between risk and executive compensation
  • Evaluating the pay mix of executives, superstars and key talent according to employee preferences and organizational needs
  • Understanding the information being communicated by shareholders to the organization via “Say on Pay” votes
  • Recognizing the differences between the “superstar” labor markets and the “non-superstar” labor markets
  • Understanding and appreciating the importance of the Compensation Discussion and Analysis (CD&A) disclosure
  • The challenge of attracting and retaining top talent while maintaining the compensation budget 

Note: The information presented in this seminar is for educational purposes and should not be interpreted as legal advice.

How will my organization and I benefit?

Participants will leave the course with an improved capacity to analyze and evaluate the efficacy of performance-based pay systems with respect to executives, key talent and superstars. Organizations can benefit through improved allocation of financial and human capital resources and a richer understanding of the effects of pay for performance on the success of their operations. 

Faculty


Linda Barrington, is Executive Director, Institute for Compensation Studies at Cornell University-ILR School. Her research appears in peer-reviewed journals and business publications and covers wide-ranging topics including new workforce entrants, business leaders' perceptions of their top challenges, compensation trends, the working poor, economic history and gender economics. Linda's book, Employment and Work (2012), was published in the Sage Reference Series on Disability. She is a frequent contributor to the media. Linda began her professional career on the economics faculty at Barnard College of Columbia University. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois.

Kevin F. Hallock, is the Donald C. Opatrny '74 Chair of the Department of Economics, Joseph R. Rich '80 Professor, Professor of Economics and HR Studies, and the Director of the Institute for Compensation Studies. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA, on the Board of Directors of WorldatWork, Distinguished Principal Research Fellow at the Conference Board, and a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources. His recent book, Pay: Why People Earn What They Earn and What You Can Do Now to Make More, was awarded the Richard A. Lester Award for the Outstanding Book in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University in 1995.

Stephanie R. Thomas, is a Research Associate of the Institute for Compensation Studies in the ILR School and a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Cornell University. Stephanie has completed research and published on a variety of labor economics topics including wage determination, pay gaps and inequality, and the quantitative analysis of employment discrimination. She is the author of Compensating Your Employees Fairly: A Guide to Internal Pay Equity. During her 15-year consulting career, she specialized in the analysis of equal employment issues and provided consulting services to Fortune 500 companies, privately held businesses, major law firms and government agencies. Stephanie has also served on the faculty of New York University, where she was awarded the Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Stephanie holds a Ph.D. in Economics from The New School for Social Research.

Melanie Tu, is the Head of Compensation at Graham Holdings Company (formerly The Washington Post Company). She brings a wealth of practitioner experience in the area of compensation. In her current role, Melanie has responsibility for executive, equity, and corporate broad-based compensation and executive benefits, as well as oversight of subsidiary companies' broad-based compensation. Her work experience includes international and sales compensation roles with Marriott International and Texas Instruments. Melanie is a graduate of Cornell University's School of Industrial and Labor Relations.